Category Archives: crime fiction

Top Five for Crime

The lovely Liss at Northern Rivers Writers Centre did a quick interview with me for the August edition of their Northerly Magazine. Here’s a snippet, and I’d be interested to hear your thoughts on adding to the list.

Oh, but first, a little taste of paradise…

picture of Byron Bay Writers Festival 2012

Byron Bay Writers Festival 2012

What are your top 5 tips for Crime writers?

1. Read widely and think deeply to understand the different sub-genres within crime and thriller literature.

2. Know where your story meets or subverts reader expectations.

3. Practice writing in short, medium, and long form.

4. Connect with crime and thriller communities, like Sisters in Crime, and with writing centres like NRWC.

5. Put your work out to carefully selected critiquing buddies and beta readers to develop confidence and strengthen your writing.

Research for Crime Fiction

You know when you have a little idea sitting in the back of your brain that just won’t go away? And it builds up so much detail and energy that it demands to be shared? And then, when you finally say it out loud (or by email), suddenly there’s this rapid dominoes effect and the idea is actually happening, a real thing, out in the world?!

I had one of those last year. I dreamed up a workshop for writers to explore ideas and information to create cracking crime stories. To my surprise and utter delight, the workshop was a hit.

This year, I had another idea to take the workshop in a new direction. I approached the Queensland Police Museum to see if they would host it. After all, what better place to learn about juicy resources for crime writers!

picture of a display from Queensland Police Museum

QPM: crime story ideas

I have just spoken to the curator of the Queensland Police Museum, the awesome Lisa Jones, to organise final details for next Saturday. Lisa has confirmed that for the ‘hands on’ part of my workshop, in addition to our tour of the museum, we will also have a BACKSTAGE PASS to all the good stuff behind the scenes at QPM.

From an overview of crime fiction subgenres and how they set your research agenda, through finding useful resources, to letting your muse loose in a room full of artefacts – there’s nothing like devoting a whole day to thinking, writing, touching, breathing ideas for your stories.

If you’d like to come along and join the fun, you can book online here, or call Queensland Writers Centre on 07 3842 9922.

  • Research for Crime Fiction workshop
  • Saturday 16 June 2012, 10:30am to 4:30pm
  • Info: Any crime fiction author will tell you the secret to compelling crime is in the details. Learn how to access primary and secondary research resources to find great ideas for your crime writing, and to flesh them into gripping stories. Meg Vann will show you how to best locate and engage crime experts for advice, and at what point in your project to consult them. You will explore creative writing techniques and structures to prompts and strengthen your use of research, and develop a research action plan for your own crime story premise.

‘Provocation’ and gratitude.

I have wanted to write since before I could read. And for six years now, I have been writing regularly. I’ve studied creative writing at uni and my local writers centre, joined a wonderful writing group, and convened another. I’ve written two long-form manuscripts, won some development grants, and had the opportunity to show my work to agents and publishers. I have enjoyed guidance and encouragement from so many generous and talented writers, as well as endless support from family and friends. But I have never been published.

Until now.

My story ‘Provocation’ was published last week in The Review of Australian Fiction. That is my name there in Volume 1, next to amazing authors like Kim Wilkins and Christos Tsiolkas and PM Newton. Pinch me!

‘Provocation’ is a psychological thriller. A young woman recovering from anorexia is covertly stalked by an inappropriately devoted security guard at her dream job. This middle-aged man has access to her every move, and an array of rationalisations to justify his increasing surveillance. Her uniquely disordered thinking becomes her best defence. But the stress triggers deepening psychosis, leading to an endgame where meaning and motive are as murky as the depths of a river in flood.

‘Provocation’ grew from a couple of ideas that kept haunting me. If you haven’t read ‘Provocation’ and think you might be interested, I would encourage you to head on over and do so before reading on here – there are no actual spoilers, but themes explored in this post may influence the way you experience the story…

Firstly, the story is dedicated in loving memory of a real-life young woman who was killed by covert violence. Her stalker had been court-ordered to keep his distance from her, her house, and her workplace. But she was dependent on medication for a chronic illness, and he put two and two together, loitering around her neighbourhood chemist. She spied him, ran home, and died there alone, literally gasping for relief.

Her death was not recorded as murder. As far as I can find out, no charges were laid,  and no action taken. (I’ve blogged about this incident, and the cathartic power of the crime narrative, in my Reading Girlhood post over at Sisters of the Pen).

The other major idea arose after the 2011 Brisbane floods. During the clean-up, I learned the library and gallery at South Bank are connected by subterranean loading docks that formed a massive underground whirlpool when the river broke its banks. The security cameras kept rolling as industrial bins were swept away like tin cans, ramming into those huge portable walls used in galleries. Fish, furniture, trash and rubble were carried from the basement of one building and deposited in far reaches of the next. I made several unauthorised tours of those docks, and there are some spooky places and machines down there, let me tell you!

Library in FloodQueensland State Library during 2011 floods

*image courtesy QPS

‘Provocation’ has no flood event, but is set in a building that was recently inundated. Those giant, interconnecting docks play an important role both as labyrinth and metaphor.

Inspired by these ideas, I formed a story premise, deciding to challenge and extend my craft – after two manuscripts in first person point of view, I wanted to write in third person with multiple viewpoint characters. I also wanted to experiment with tense, changing from past to present for the climax. And I needed a break from long-form fiction and humorous crime, so was drawn to the thriller novelette: ten thousand words to develop and deliver a lyrical story? Heaven!

As I tell my students, writing is a valid and worthwhile pursuit in and of itself. I don’t write with the expectation of being published. But it feels great to have developed a career as far as this significant milestone.

I love writing so much, in so many ways. I am profoundly grateful to all the people who have supported me to get this far, and just so thankful that I get to write.

Crime Writers Go Tribal

One day, I will make it to Harrogate for the Annual Crime Writing Festival, “Europe’s largest gathering of crime writers” (according to The Guardian). Which is happening RIGHT NOW, by the way.

Yep, I’m sitting here in my Brisbane loungeroom while mere continents away, PD James is being honoured with a veteran award, the Crime Novel of the Year is being announced, and thousands of crime writers and readers are generally festivalling like mad.

It’s just not right! I should be there!

The freak nature/nurture confluence that moulded this dedicated crime fic tragic instilled in me, from a tender age, a deep compulsion to know everything there is to know about my home genre. And there’s only so much of that goal I can achieve from my wi-fied microsuede bullet-proof couch.

But look! It’s Sisters in Crime to the rescue!

Logo for SheKilda Again 2011

Australian and international crime writers will gather in Melbourne for SheKilda Again on 7-9 October. 

The Plot: To celebrate women’s crime writing on the page and screen and bring a collective critical eye to the field.

The Motive: To mark the 20th anniversary of Sisters in Crime Australia Inc by a 500-strong gathering that brings together women writers, true crime practitioners and those who enjoy women’s crime writing.

Oh happy, happy days. My tribe is gathering, and I am SO there.

The Lincoln Lawyer’s in town…

Squee! My awesomely smart and talented friend, Donna Hancox, is in conversation with Michael Connelly in a couple of weeks:

Author pic Michael Connelly

Michael Connelly

Brisbane Wednesday 25 May 6.30 pm

  • Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane Writers’ Festival and Brisbane’s Better Bookshops present: Michael Connelly in conversation with Donna Hancox
  • Venue: QUT Auditorium, Kelvin Grove
  • Cost: Free. Bookings: Not required
A journalist and crime writer, Michael Connelly is an articulate and hugely successful author. And Dr Donna is just the person to stimulate a fascinating discussion with him. Can’t wait!

Brisbane Sisters in Crime

Great news! The Brisbane chapter of Sisters in Crime is re-forming.

Women who love crime writing and live within cooee of Brisbane are welcome to come along to our first meeting.

Sisters in Crime Australia logo

NEW BRISBANE SISTERS-IN-CRIME MEETING
Where: Avid Reader bookstore, 193 Boundary St, West End
Date: Saturday 7 May 2011
Time: 12.30pm
Cost: FREE! (Lunch available for purchase from Avid Reader café)

Come along to chat about what you are reading, what you are writing,
and what you would like from your local chapter of Sisters in Crime Australia.

Sisters in Crime Australia (SinCOz) was inspired by the American organisation of the same name, founded in 1986 by Sara Paretsky (creator of Chicago PI VI Warshawski). It exists to celebrate and promote women’s crime writing.

SinCOz has been running since 1991. It produces fantastic events and opportunities for crime writers, such as the Davitt Awards, the Scarlet Stiletto Awards, and the SheKilda Conventions. The Sisters in Crime Australia website explains what SinCOz is all about:

  • To bring together women crime writers, screen-writers, producers, booksellers, publishers, lawyers, judges, police, forensic specialists, librarians, academics, and critics but in the main, readers and viewers.
  • To discuss and analyse books, film and television shows, law and justice issues, new trends and critical issues of the crime genre.
  • To explore the contemporary issues at the heart of much crime fiction as well as dissecting its rich history.
  • To promote the professional development of women crime writers, especially emerging writers.
  • To provide opportunities for networking between writers, publishers and producers and between writers and their readers and viewers.
  • To have fun – and lots of it.

For more info, leave a question in the comments here, or like our page on Facebook.

Thrills with JJ..

Awesome workshop for crime thriller writers coming up at QWC this Saturday 16 April!

Image of JJ Cooper author

JJ Cooper

Grip It and Rip It: Successful author and former military interrogator JJ Cooper shows you how to develop credible plotlines, dialogue, artful suspense, and the all-important pace for a great thriller.

Highly recommend!

Lecherer, moi?

It has been a whirlwind year of teaching for this crime fic tragic!

So far, I have devised and conducted a full day workshop on research for crime fiction, including  hands-on session with the heritage collection at the John Oxley Library. I have tutored a four-week course on creative writing at QWC, and am about to tutor a similar course for the AWM Online Learning Centre.. I am also tutoring in the Genre Fiction course at The University of Queensland.

And to top it off, last night I gave a lecture on research for crime fiction to hundreds of students at UQ!

I love working with students of creative writing – everyone has a fresh take to offer, and it is a privilege to walk alongside writers for awhile as they develop skills and confidence.

And of course, my first love is teaching crime fic research and development. I cover the historical development of the genre and its many sub- and sub-sub- and hybrid genres. I share heaps of visual, textual and personal research sources, like the Howdunit series for writers, and the websites for the Australian Federal Police, and the Queensland Police Museum. And I look at research in action, discussing character, context and conflict in excerpts from fantastic writers like Katherine Howell, Leigh Redhead, and Shamini Flint.

Book of Poisons for Writers book cover

Awesome Gruesomes!

A wise friend told me years ago that people usually find success by doing what they are passionate about – I didn’t believe her at the time, because allowing myself to pursue my dreams of crime writing seemed so impossibly unachievable.

So I encourage everyone to dedicate some time this weekend to doing what you love – you never know where it will lead!

Real Life Hero

One of the things I love about writing crime is that I am compelled to consult with some of the coolest, most adventurous experts on the planet. One such expert who very generously gave me his time for a couple of phone calls outlining the basics of his work has now written a book of his own!

The Retriever: The True Story of a Child Retrieval Expert and the
Families he has Reunited By Grantlee Kieza, Keith Schafferius.

If the brief conversations I had with Keith Schafferius are anything to go by, this book will be a gripping read, providing insight into the high-stakes and sometimes heartbreaking work of retrieving abducted children.

Picture of Keith Schafferius

Keith Schafferius, Child Retrieval Detective

“Schafferius once posed as a Hollywood movie mogul, using a forged British Honduras passport and fake ID to win the confidence and support of Middle East officials, while trying to retrieve two abducted children.”

 

 

Keith helped me understand some of the ways in which an investigator might trace an international skip, so that I could construct a credible series of steps for my protagonist to follow as she tracked down an absconded fraudster (and possible murderer).

I am thrilled Keith has put his experiences into a book of his own, with the able assistance of journalist Grantlee Kieza, and I can’t wait to get my hands on a copy!

Poison and justice …

poison doughnut

I’ll blog about this fabulous Criminal Brief overview of self-publishing over at Speakeasy, but it is so useful I want to share it here as well - for two reasons.

In itself, it is a sage warning about the pitfalls of vanity publishing for writers (‘Neither authors nor readers are well-served by self-published fiction’), while outlining the usefulness of self-publishing for certain projects. 

But also, the site is one for crime buffs to watch, being A Mystery Short Story Web Log Project. Super cool!

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Fictional or in real life, Melbourne’s upcoming Crime and Justice Festival has it covered. I am crying into my beautiful Pulp Fiction Press edition of Cocaine Blues that I won’t make it to hear Kerry Greenwood. If someone in the blogosphere is going, can you please tweet the highlights? Let me know so I can follow you!

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Cake Week at the poison doughnut!  I want cake week at QWC!

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